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Meet the Anthro Advisor!

Dr. Stacy Lindshield is an Academic Advisor and Lecturer in Anthropology. She teaches several undergraduate and graduate courses in general and biological anthropology. As an advisor and instructor, she aims to share her professional experience with students wanting to pursue a career in anthropology. More broadly, she aims to help Iowa State students recognize the importance of anthropological knowledge to everyday life.

We want you to find your home with us!

Walk-In Hours:

Wednesdays 10 am to 12 pm or:

Schedule an appointment

CONTACT:

Office: 325 Curtiss Hall

Phone: 294-0056

Emailslind_anthr@iastate.edu

We want you to have some amazing experiences in the field during your undergraduate studies. Below are several scholarships to help you achieve that.

NANCY R. COINMAN AWARD FOR ANTHROPOLOGICAL RESEARCH

Anthropology at ISU offers a research award for an anthropology student who wishes to conduct anthropological research. One award for $300 will be awarded each spring semester. The applicant will be a graduate student majoring or minoring in anthropology at Iowa State University who demonstrates a strong interest in anthropological research. The grant is intended to supplement travel and research expenses.

The applicant must submit a 1-page proposal describing their research and its significance, any previous research or relevant course work in Anthropology, and how this award will enhance their research interests and goals.  Applications will be reviewed by a faculty review committee. In addition to the cash award, the recipient’s name will be recorded on the Nancy R. Coinman Research Award plaque.

SHU-MIN HUANG EAST ASIAN STUDIES RESEARCH AWARD

Anthropology at ISU offers a research award for an anthropology student who wishes to do research in East Asian studies. The award is for research support and/or travel to East Asia for the purpose of carrying out research. One award for $300 will be awarded each spring semester. The applicant may be an undergraduate or graduate student majoring or minoring in anthropology at Iowa State University who demonstrates a strong interest in East Asian studies. The grant is intended to supplement travel and research expenses.

The applicant must submit a one-page proposal describing their personal interests in East Asian studies, the nature of the proposed research and its significance, any previous research or relevant course work in East Asian studies, and how this award will enhance such research interests and goals. Applications will be reviewed by faculty. In addition to the cash award, the recipient’s name will be recorded on the Shu-min Huang East Asian Studies Research Award plaque.

THE D. MICHAEL WARREN MEMORIAL STUDENT RESEARCH IN AFRICA GRANT

Anthropology at ISU offers a small travel grant for a student who wishes to do summer research in Africa. One grant for $300 will be awarded each spring semester. The applicant must be a junior or senior undergraduate student or graduate student majoring or minoring in anthropology at Iowa State University who demonstrates a strong interest in the peoples and cultures of modern Africa.

The applicant must submit a one-page proposal describing a well-thought out and feasible research activity in a specific African country. Research can focus on a broad spectrum of topics, such as indigenous knowledge systems, agricultural activities, family and community, economic and political structures, religion and the arts. Students may earn up to three credits of independent study (Anthro 490 or 590), which must be arranged prior to carrying out the research. Within one semester following the end of the research period, the recipient is required to submit a report on the research activity and findings.

WHITEFORD AWARD FOR UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH

Anthropology at ISU offers a small travel grant for a student who wishes to do summer research as an undergraduate. One grant for $300 will be awarded each spring semester. The applicant must be an undergraduate student student majoring or minoring in anthropology at Iowa State University.

The applicant must submit a one-page proposal describing a well-thought out and feasible research project or opportunity. Students may earn up to three credits of independent study (Anthro 490 or 590), which must be arranged prior to carrying out the research. Within one semester following the end of the research period, the recipient is required to submit a report on the research activity and findings.

By studying anthropology you open the door to many career opportunities in which your newly-found knowledge of cultures and humankind will take you far beyond the classroom and campus (though those are pretty nice jobs, we think!). Whether you want to work in a large corporation, government, or a non-profit, many job titles probably won’t have “Anthropologist” anywhere in them! Here you can read the rest of the article quoted above.

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Whether you work in market research, international development, or historical preservation, there are many types of jobs out there for you. As an anthropologist, though, your work will always be outside of the normal grind of many jobs because your focus on culture will always set you apart and make your work meaningful!

Read more about different career paths here at the website of the American Anthropological society. Check out this site answering the age-old question: “What can I do with this degree?

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CAREER SPOTLIGHT:

Cultural Resources Management (CRM)

One booming sector right now is CRM. In this field your job would be to preserve, conserve, and act as a steward to important cultural materials such as:

  • Historic properties
  • Native American graves and cultural items
  • Shipwrecks
  • Museum collections
  • Historical documents
  • Religious sites
  • Religious practices
  • Cultural use of natural resources
  • Folklife, tradition, and other social institutions
  • Theater groups, orchestras, and other community cultural amenities

Below are the nuts and bolts of our major and minor but don’t hesitate to contact our advisor if you have any questions!

MAJOR

To earn a major you must complete:

Course #

ANTHR 201

ANTHR 202

ANTHR 306

ANTHR 307

ANTHR 308

ANTHR 450

Anthro Choice

Credits

3

3

3

3

3

3

15

TOTAL: 33 

Title

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Introduction to Biological Anthropology & Archaeology

Cultural Anthropology

Biological Anthropology

Archaeology

Historical and Theoretical Approaches in Anthropology

Select an additional 15 credits of electives in Anthropology

Complementary Courses

Course #

Stat 101 or 104

Engl 302, 309, or 314

Minor Choice

Credits

4

3

15

Title

Introduction to Statistics

Select (1) advanced writing course

Select at least (1) subject area as a minor

Meet an Anthro Major!

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MINOR

In today’s diverse and globalized society, an Anthropology minor is an excellent complement to many majors. A familiarity with anthropology is especially helpful to those seeking work in multi-national corporations, social service professions, education, and politics. You will learn about different ways of life, human history, and ways of understanding human interaction.

 

To earn a minor, you must complete:

ANTHR 201

ANTHR 202

One of the following courses in cultural anthropology: 306, 309, 322, 323, 340

One of the following courses in biological anthropology or archaeology: 307, 308, 315, 319, 321, 482

Three additional credits in ANTHR at the 300+ level

Anthropology 428D: Peopling of the New World

 

When did people enter the New World? Where did they come from? How did they survive? What was the environment like when they arrived? How did they learn the landscape? What effects did these colonizers have on now-extinct large mammal populations?

 

The study of the peopling of the New World transcends multiple scientific disciplines. This course examines evidence from archeology, geology, paleontology, human genetics, linguistics and skeletal biology to address these questions.

 

 

FieldSChools

Many anthropology students choose to participate in field schools throughout the United States and abroad during the summer months.  Field schools provide opportunities for training in archaeological reconnaissance and excavation techniques; documentation and interpretation of archaeological evidence.  The academic credits earned from participating in a field school can often be counted towards the 18 credits of required Anthropology electives.

StudyAbroad

Study Abroad programs provide an additional opportunity for students to gain first-hand experience with the cultures and people groups they learn about in the classroom.  More information about the Study Abroad experiences that Iowa State offers can be found at: http://www.studyabroad.iastate.edu/.

Internships

Students have the opportunity to earn academic credit for experiential learning through internships.  Students must initiate the internship process by contacting an appropriate agency (e.g. museum, non-profit community center, research institution).  If this agency offers a student an internship position, the student can apply to receive academic credit for his or her internship through ANTHR434.

Previous internships have been completed through:

  • Iowa State University Parks Library Special Collections
  • Iowa State University Museums
  • Iowa Council for International Understanding
  • Putnam Museum
  • The Smithsonian’s Folklife Festival
Employment

Many people ask the question, “What can I do with a degree in anthropology?”  In general, an undergraduate degree in anthropology prepares individuals for graduate and professional programs as well as a variety of administrative and applied positions in government, museums, and business.

For more information regarding careers that utilize a degree in anthropology, check out the following websites:

For more information regarding employers who are seeking to hire graduates of Iowa State University, visit the Career Management Service.  Students can upload resumes, cover letters, and apply directly for jobs.  There are currently more than 11,000 employers seeking to hire our graduates for a variety of positions.


ANTHROPOLOGY LAB

The Iowa State University Archaeological Laboratory (ISUAL) was established in 1964 as a result of contracted archaeological work with the National Park Service in the Red Rock Reservoir along the Des Moines River south of the City of Des Moines. ISUAL conducts sponsored and original research in Iowa archaeology. The sponsored work is done in accordance with established guidelines of the Association of Iowa Archaeologists and the Historic Preservation Bureau of the State Historical Society of Iowa

The ISUAL laboratory facilities are located in both East Hall and the Industrial Education II building on the ISU Campus. These facilities include a teaching laboratory, two research laboratories, and a seed flotation laboratory. The teaching laboratory is utilized during classes offered by the Anthropology Department. The two research laboratories are used primarily for sponsored and original research conducted by ISUAL, as well as for Department of Anthropology graduate student research.

ISUAL also serves as a designated federal repository for federal collections and supporting documentation made under contract with agencies such as the National Park Service and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Also included in the repository are items from Anthropology Department-sponsored field schools, donations, teaching collections for the Anthropology Department, and specimens on loan to ISUAL.

ANTHROPOLOGY CLUB (ANTHRO CLUB)

Our purpose is to enrich our future Anthropologists at ISU in the Anthropological field. Not only would we like to become more aware of Anthropological fields and studies via speakers who are involved in Anthropology, but we would also like to gain more hands-on experience that may not be offered inside the classroom. We hope to create a comfortable environment in which students can learn and become excited about Anthropology, while creating lasting friendships.

Zach Graham, 2014

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chose to study Anthropology and International Studies and enroll in Army ROTC at Iowa State University because of the unique opportunities that the fields of study could offer me.  Growing up, I had a keen interest in foreign cultures, but never had the opportunity to travel beyond the United States. Anthropology provided me with knowledge of the world at the micro and macro level and a deep academic understanding of what culture is. International Studies offered me with the skills to analyze the present and future through a historical framework. Army ROTC was an opportunity to apply the knowledge and intellectual framework I gained through study in making decisions that had implications far beyond myself.

  • Zach with the Massai Tribe in Tanzania.

During my years at Iowa State, I was able to actualize my interest in foreign cultures and travel by traveling to Africa three times through working with an NGO in Tanzania, studying Arabic in Morocco under the Department of Defense Global Officer Scholarship program, and through study abroad with the Anthropology Department in Ethiopia.   

Upon graduation with a double major in Anthropology and International Studies and minor in Military Science, I commissioned as an Active Duty Second Lieutenant in the United States Army as a Military Intelligence Officer. I was assigned to serve my four-year military commitment in Germany as Battalion Intelligence Officer for 2-159th Attack Reconnaissance Battalion, 12th Combat Aviation Brigade.

My academic studies greatly prepared me for the independence and deep introspection required for my work in Intelligence. I am in charge of the intelligence analysis and dissemination as well as security for over 700 Soldiers and 30 Army helicopters operating in nearly a dozen countries in Europe at any given time. This leads my daily work to be as varied as creating briefs on Russian Air-Defense Artillery equipment capabilities in Kaliningrad to giving presentations on the linguistic and cultural backgrounds of our partner military forces in the Northern Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). My education at Iowa State left an indelible mark on me; I owe a great deal to the professors and my fellow students from the Anthropology, International Studies, and Military Science departments.

Ben Kenkel, Senior in Anthropology

Studying abroad in Europe as an undergraduate student has been one amazing discovery after another! As an anthropology student, I studied abroad with the intention of pursuing a unique and different point of view. I also wanted to understand more about archaeology and other methods of research. I was fortunate that the program I chose to participate in had four weeks in which I could explore the continent and immerse myself in new situations, ideas, and cultures.

These experiences have given me an entirely new point of view regarding anthropology and more importantly, the people behind anthropology. Traveling to places such as Budapest, Hungary and Marseille, France and being able to view such different cultures in such a short amount of time really highlights the differences in all people and provides me with food for thought for any research I may undertake during the rest of my undergraduate education.